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Federal Funding Awarded To Lancaster County For Future Road Projects

LINCOLN–(News Release Nov. 17)–Lancaster County Engineering says they’ve been awarded federal funding to help with the completion of three future road projects around the county.

In a press release, LCE said the funds are through the Nebraska Department of Transportation and the Metropolitan Planning Organization, and will be used for projects in the northern part of the county.

The first is the replacement of a bridge going over the Little Salt Creek, just east of 27th & Arbor Road.

“[The bridge] (F-201) is a 120′ concrete slab bridge built in 1965,” county engineering said in a press release. “Currently, this bridge is rated poor, scour susceptible, and has a sufficiency rating of less than 50. The program agreement through NDOT will allow Lancaster County Engineering to start the engineering design on this bridge replacement. The design and environmental permitting for this bridge will be very complex. We anticipate that it will take a minimum of two years to complete.”

The second project LEC mentions is the paving of NW 56th Street from the north side of the I-80 bridge to W Holdrege.

“This section of road is very close to the new Lincoln Northwest High School. The program agreement through NDOT will allow Lancaster County Engineering to start the engineering design to pave this section of road from the I-80 bridge to the end of the pavement in the City of Lincoln’s jurisdiction.”

The third project would be the paving of Fletcher Avenue from 84th Street to 148th Street.

“The program agreement through NDOT will allow Lancaster County Engineering to start the engineering design to pave this section of road. This will create a truck route around the City of Waverly and allow farm-to-market access in Lincoln.”

LCE says these projects will not be fully funded what the money that’s going to be made available.

“These projects are currently programmed with MPO funding for 80% of the cost of the engineering design only. Additional funding will be required in the future for construction. The total estimated cost for these three projects is currently estimated at $8.5 million.”

Lancaster County Engineer Pam Dingman: “All three of these projects are very close to the City of Lincoln and will provide for the future growth of our urbanizing county. In addition, they will provide much-needed farm-to-market and school routes for our growing communities in Lancaster County. As county engineer, I will continue to seek additional funding to construct these important projects.”



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